north carolina

Registration is Open for the 4th Annual NC Marine Debris Symposium

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Marine debris is a problem that continues to grow.  Our waterways and oceans are constantly polluted with a wide variety of marine debris ranging from polystyrene trays and plastic bags to derelict fishing equipment and abandoned boats.
Marine life, such as several Fish species, Whales, Sharks, Sea Turtles, and Birds have been known to ingest marine debris or become entangled in marine debris, which may lead to injury, intestinal blockage, and death.  Marine debris is an Eastern North Carolina concern not only because of the threats to our native wildlife, our ecosystem and our own health, but it also washes up on beaches and shorelines degrading the environment, and effecting our local economy and tourism.
Local cooperation and regional partnership is needed to create public awareness while developing ways to decrease the amount of debris going into the waterways as well as cleaning up the debris found in our waterways and on our shores.
We hope that this Symposium will create local cooperation and regional partnership by providing a forum for the exchange of information on recent developments, program ideas, and best management practices for marine debris prevention, education, and removal.

Register here: 2016 Registration for the NCMDS in Wrightsville Beach, NC

Earth and Surf Fest is Gearing Up for Good Time

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Get ready for ONE awesome day of FUN for the entire family at the Tenth Annual Earth and Surf Fest on Saturday, July 9th in North Topsail Beach.

This rad waste-free eco awareness event showcases many of the splendors that there is to enjoy in our coastal community environment.

Things get kicked off at 7am with registration for the Fun, Sun, and 5K Run on the beach, a one mile fun run, and the On Shore Surf Shop surf contest.

A free beach yoga session is offered by Keep Onslow Beautiful Committee member and certified yoga instructor, Christina Lewis, at 10am.  Bring a mat or towel and get ready to sweat and breathe in the sweet salty ocean air.  Don’t forget your refillable/reusable water bottle.  Refilling stations will be located at the event.

Live music begins in the morning and continues throughout the day.  We will also have a live broadcast with fav local DJ, Vaughn, from the morning show at Modern Rock 98.7/.

Local musician, artist, and long time beach sweeper, Justina will get things started with an acoustic solo act at the bathhouse stage area.  Headliners are local surf music jam rockers, Arise Awake who will get us through the mid day.

Later that afternoon, you get the chance to show your talents with a 2 hour open mic gig hosted by Wes Rider.  Be sure to bring a guitar, drums, or whatever you need to showcase your talents. Open mic jam session begins at 3pm and there will be a sign up form available at the bathhouse stage area starting at 2:30pm.

A traditional beach cleanup will be held throughout the day with the crew at the Plastic Ocean Project.  Prizes will be given, you can learn how to participate in a fun citizen science program, and you also have the chance to earn SAT credit hours (for high school volunteers).

This is a waste-free event so place make sure to carpool, bring your own reusable water bottle, and use the recycle and compost bins properly. Pack in and pack out any waste you bring that is not compostable or recyclable, please. There will be a healthy and waste-free food truck on site for all your munching needs throughout the day.

Healthy and eco friendly vendors and environmental education booths include:  Keep Onslow Beautiful, Plastic Ocean Project, Spring Locker, White Oak New River Association, NC Coastal Federation, Onslow Co Museum, NC CMAST and NC Youth Ocean Conservation Summit, Arbonne, Your Bottle Means Jobs, Sonoco Recycling, Loggerhead Designs, Oceana, Going Green, Beauty Counter, On Shore Surf Shop,Forkful Food Truck, Sparkling ICE, and more…

Thank you so much to our sponsors: KIXX Outfitters, On Shore Surf Shop, Only in Onslow, Sonoco Recycling, Spring Locker, Sparkling ICE, Keep Onslow Beautiful, Onslow County Solid Waste Department, Onslow County Parks and Recreation, Nixon, Dragon, Loggerhead Designs, Hyperflex Wetsuits, …lost, Global Surf Industries, Savage Surfboards, Sanuk, Prolite, Go Pro, Clean Energy Events, and Sun Bum.

Be sure to check out http://www.earthandsurffest.com for registration, location with a map, and event info.

 

 

ECHS AP Environmental Science Class Partners with the Duke Marine Lab to study Marine Debris

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East Carteret High School’s Advanced Placement Environmental Science Class will be presenting tomorrow on the Marine Debris work they’ve been doing with the Duke Marine Lab this semester.

During the past year, the class has toured the Duke Marine Lab drone facility and received hands-on experience in the operation of “autonomous fixed wing and multicopter” platforms in use for supporting marine science studies and research.

The AP class also had the opportunity to analyze large files of aerial multi-spectral, high-resolution images, and orthomosaics with a focus on marine debris. This opportunity offers valuable skills and experience that also engages them in improving our community environment.

The class also traveled to Carrot Island in Beaufort, also known as the Rachel Carson Reserve, which is a National Estuarine Research Reserve right across Taylor’s Creek from Front Street, to “ground-truth” the data they had analyzed.

To close-the-loop on the work they had been doing at the drone facility, and tracking marine debris from the air, the class visited the same site this past Monday to remove the marine debris that they had analyzed; eight students collected over ten bags of debris in about an hour.  Materials were separated to make sure recyclables were captured.  Since this island is not inhabited, it is clear that the debris is both washing up and also littered by reserve visitors.

The presentation, tomorrow at ECHS, will be the culmination of this marine debris research using drones.  Marine Debris specialists, researchers, removal coordinators, and stakeholders will be present to learn from the students and offer insight on how we move forward to collaborate and continue the effort to study, remove, and reduce marine debris here in North Carolina.

More to come…

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Permuda Island Trash Fishing Tournament

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The National Estuarine Research Reserve, Keep Onslow Beautiful, Plastic Ocean Project, On Shore Surf Shop, and others partnered this past weekend for a Paddle Trash Fishing Tournament along the banks of Permuda Island, a local estuarine reserve site in North Topsail Beach, NC.  (see the news report link here:

http://www.wwaytv3.com/2016/05/14/paddle-tournament-cleans-waterways/ )

Want to join in on the next cleanup?  Stay tuned right here for updates on regional cleanups and more…

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Friday the 13th Cleanup

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Pine Knoll Shores Aquarium

Shackleford Banks

BEACH KEEPERS BEACH CLEAN-UP

FRIDAY MAY, 13

Help keep the Crystal Coast pristine on Friday, May 13 during a public Beach Keepers beach clean-up event. Spend the day removing marine debris from Shackleford Banks with Cape Lookout National Seashore, the Crystal Coast Tourism Authority, Island Express Ferries and the Aquarium. Advance registration is required and participants need to provide their own food, reusable water bottles, and other beach necessities. This free event begins at 7:30 a.m. in Beaufort and will last approximately seven hours, including transportation to and from Shackleford Banks. For those on Instagram, the event will also include an InstaMeet – an opportunity for Instagrammers to come together, share photos, and tell stories about the day.

May 137:30 – 2:00

Help keep the Crystal Coast pristine on Friday, May 13, in a public Beach Keepers clean-up on Shackleford Banks. Join us at 600 Front Street, Beaufort, and spend the day removing marine debris from Shackleford Banks. For those on Instagram, the event will also include an InstaMeet. This is a great project for families or groups with children and is appropriate for anyone ages 8 and up.  Be prepared to get wet and dirty!

What to Bring:

Water Shoes

Sunscreen

Lunch and Reusable water bottle


Ages 8 and up, maximum 60 participants

Duration 7 Hours

This activity is free

REGISTER HERE:

https://reservations.ncaquariums.com/pineknollshores/Info.aspx?EventID=1015

Environmental Heroes

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Bonnie Monteleone – Plastic Ocean Project

I was asked recently to give several presentations at local libraries about “Environmental Heroes”.  This took some thought and consideration, because throughout my life I have had so many.

My first environmental hero is my dad, George Victor Smith.  He taught me how to enjoy nature.  I grew up with my beautiful sister, Drew, right along the ICW in Beaufort, NC.  Days were filled with marsh mud up to my ankles (sometimes knees) and playing with periwinkles from the marsh grass or frogs from the ditch.  We canoed, fished, learned to swim, and played with every creature we could find.  My dad thought me that it’s okay to get muddy, explore, and really discover nature by getting my hands dirty.

When I was around 10 years old, and in the Girl Scouts, I learned about Rachel Carson and joined the NC Big Sweep beach cleanups as a volunteer.  Rachel Carson is a well-known environmental hero and continues to inspire millions worldwide with the research she published in order to save coastal wildlife.  I think what I learned most from her books and teachings is that no matter the struggle, everyone has a voice and to never give up on what you feel is right for the environment.

At around age 20 and during college, my environmental hero was my environmental biology professor, Dr. Gilbert Grant.  A world-traveling environmental hero, who’s passion for birds and bats, taught me not only about the laws of ecology, but during some travels together I learned about ethnobotany, identifying plant species in the field, and also how documenting and recording data for publication plays a vital role in studying how our ecosystems are changing now and in the future and allows for others to share the same knowledge.

In my mid twenties, my environmental hero or heroes, I should say, were the very inspiring members of the Carolina Recycling Association, as mentioned during #WasteReductionWednesday s.  These fine illustrious (as Tom Rhodes would say) colleagues inspired me to go full-tilt-boogy into the resource management world as a career and I have never looked back ever since.  The knowledge gained by each member has shown me how not only to implement sustainable waste reduction programs in the community, but also to live the sustainable and waste free lifestyle – practicing what I teach.

In my early 30s, I had so many environmental heroes.  Three of which stand out the most to me.  My dear friend, Kristin Fountain, is a local environmental hero with strong coastal roots and has taught me to have no fear when it comes to protecting what you love (the marine environment).  She left home during college to live in Cambodia for two years and volunteer for a Sea Horse Conservation program.

Kristin was very inspirational and quite possibly the single reason that I learned to scuba dive.  Dr. Sylvia Earle, a well-known environmental hero, has also been a huge inspiration and has helped me, through her writings and documentaries, to find the words to teach others about how our fate and the ocean’s fate are one and the same.

Another hero of my mid thirties is Captain Charles Moore.  He discovered the Pacific Garbage Patch by accident and he continues to study the area and educate others about it’s detrimental effects to us all.  Someone who reminds me a lot of Captain Moore is my fav local environmental hero, Bonnie Monteleone of UNCW and the Plastic Ocean Project.  She has been to every ocean gyre collecting plastic debris and studying things like chemical absorption and the effects plastics have on certain marine creatures.  She also came up with one of the best ideas I have seen yet on how to teach folks about plastics in the ocean.  She has a traveling art exhibit.  Check it out here:  www.plasticoceanproject.org

One of my most recent environmental heroes, past three years, is my dear friend Dr. Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia.  She is a professor of environmental engineering and has studied solid waste infrastructure all over the world.  She is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to how our impacts on land effect the quality of our oceans and has developed my fav app of all time, the #MarineDebrisTracker App.  (free to download on your smart device).  Check it out here:  http://www.marinedebris.engr.uga.edu

I met Jenna while working to form the NC Marine Debris Symposium stakeholder group three years ago and she has been a key leader in our group ever since.  I adore her not only for sharing her knowledge and inspiring me to learn more about plastics in the ocean, but also she, like all of my heroes, practices what she teaches and is a role model for all.

Most recently Jenna was part of the eXXpedition (http://exxpedition.com) Atlantic journeying at sea aboard a 72 foot sailing vessel studying plastics in the ocean and making her way with other women across the Atlantic for this research.  She inspired me to submit an application to join the 2015 crew (eXXpedition Amazon).  Now, officially part of the 2015 eXXpedition crew, I will be continuing her research and collecting samples and conducting studies both land-based and at sea for the month of Dec.

My most recent environmental heroes are Olivia (10) and Carter Ries (12) of One More Generation (http://onemoregeneration.org), a non-profit that they built because they see the need for youth involvement in shaping our future community environment around the world.  Just like Rachel Carson, these young heroes are a voice for a generation to become inspired, take notice, and support.  Their efforts are vast and impressive.  From the preservation of our endangered wildlife and environmental conservation to youth empowerment and the list of projects and programs they are taking on keeps growing.

My husband, Wes Rider, is an environmental hero protecting the ocean with his pre-surf session beach cleanups.  My sister, Drew, is a true waste reduction environmental hero and is a minimalist when it comes to consumer products.  My friend, Beth Howard, and the art teacher at Dixon Elementary School is my hero for helping start up the school recycling program at her school and is a long-time volunteer at the local sea-turtle hospital.

My list of environmental heroes is always growing.  It is important for all of us to seek out the inspiration of others.  We are never so full of knowledge that we cannot learn from the experience of others, no matter their age, background, or where they live.  We should all aspire to be environmental heroes if only just for the preservation of our own community environment, but to those that yearn to go above and beyond, I salute you today and everyday.  You are all my environmental heroes.  “…do your best, because we need you.” – Anonymous Interviewee during the documentary eXXpedition Atlantic

Blue skies and calm seas,

L

Happy Birthday National Ocean Policy

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Happy Birthday to the National Ocean Policy (NOP)

Happy Birthday NOP

Hawksbill 2 2014

Learn more here: Healthy Oceans Coalition / NOP Background

Want to do more for our marine environment locally?  Please consider volunteering for the Plastic Ocean Project, Keep Onslow Beautiful, Project AWARE, or a local Surfrider Foundation chapter and also be sure to register for and attend the  North Carolina Marine Debris Symposium

Don’t have time to officially volunteer for an org, but still want to be an environmental hero – clean your beach whenever you are there, pick up debris in a parking lot on your way to and from your car, or simply donate to help fund vital programs that help preserve our marine ecosystem.

Blue skies and calm seas,

L

Waste Reduction Wednesday: Carolina Recycling Association

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Happy #WasteReductionWednesday!

Today I thought I would talk a little about one of my favorite professional associations that I have been a member of for over 11 years.  The Carolina Recycling Association was recommended to me when I started my career in resource management by a colleague.  I went to my first #CRA conference back in 2004 and was blown away by the wealth of knowledge that surrounded me and I immediately aspired to not only learn as much as I could, but to progress in a way that would make me a waste reduction and recycling leader as well.  After a few conferences and many hours of study in-between, I found myself a CRA conference speaker on several occasions, workshop host, planning committee member, board member, and in 2014 I was honored with the sought after Recycler of the Year Award.

It has been a pleasure and privilege to work amongst such a well-educated, hard-working, and dedicated group of environmental heroes.  Most folks don’t know how much work goes into recycling, waste reduction efforts, and proper resource management infrastructure in local communities.  We put our cart at the street and it magically gets managed.  Carolina Recycling Association members are the folks that work day and night making these efforts possible while also spreading the knowledge of the importance not only to the environment, but also to the local economy.

Here is a brief summary of what the CRA is all about:

The mission of the Carolina Recycling Association is to conserve resources by advancing recycling and waste reduction throughout the Carolinas (North, South, and beyond).

The overall goal of the CRA is to promote waste reduction recycling of marketable/recyclable materials in the Carolinas.

The members, including myself, of CRA recognize that:

Recycling reduces the weight and volume, and therefore cost, of waste to be disposed and reintroduces into the economy materials previously considered without value.

Recycling supports manufacturing.  Production of everything from steel to glass, paper, packaging, automobile and construction products, and textiles are made from recycled material in the Carolinas.

Recycling creates jobs and business opportunities.  It is one of the most consistently growing sectors of the economy in the Carolinas.

Recycling helps reduce the need for new landfills.  The growth in recycling has helped increase landfill capacity in NC from 20 to 32 years.

Recycling allows citizens to contribute to environmental solutions.  Through the simple act of recycling, Carolinians save water and energy, prevent pollution, protect habitats, and conserve valuable resources.

Recycling improves the quality of life in Carolina communities.

Carolina Recycling Association Objectives:

Education: CRA uses workshops, networking meetings, and the Annual Conference to spread the knowledge and skills of recycling professionals and experts, as well as educating members on new technologies and programs that will benefit their businesses and communities.

Public-Private Partnerships: CRA develops broad-based community alliances throughout the Carolinas and beyond, to achieve sustainable community improvement in recycling and waste reduction methods.

Board and Council Action: By engaging Board Members and Councils, we extend the reach of our educational activities and increase the impact of our efforts.

To learn more or to sign up to be a CRA member or supporter, please go to www.cra-recycle.org

Blue skies, calm seas, and don’t forget to Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle,

L


 

Salty Saturday with the Priechenfried Crew

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Had a lovely day on the water with the Priechenfried’s (Amy, Carl, and my fav misfit crew of mini pirates) today.  Weather was a wee bit windy, but the temp was perfect.  We made our way to a little island just North of Bear and just South of EI.  It was a very small piece of real estate that we made our home for several hours of grilling and chilling, SUPing, kayaking, and other salty hair and sandy feet activities.

Here is a snippet of our day:

 

Until next time…

Wishing you all Blue Skies and Calm Seas,