Uncategorized

Water Quality for Fisheries: Stormwater Pollution Impacts

Posted on

Image
Water Quality for Fisheries:

Stormwater Pollution Impacts

71ce2f9c-ceb4-4c2c-b264-3cd4f9ba04cc.png
Water-Quality-Final.png
GRAPHIC: Noah Weaver, The Stormwater Pollution Cycle, 2021
The Coastal Carolina Riverwatch Water Quality for Fisheries Program (WQ4F) includes a coalition of recreational and commercial fishers that work to identify, prioritize, and tackle actions that protect the quality of water and quality of life in coastal NC. During the WQ4F survey, those who fish on the coast of NC identified stormwater pollution as a top priority focus for reducing water quality impacts to fisheries.

Due to rapid growth in coastal areas, increased construction, and the draining of wetlands, the amount of impervious surfaces has increased tremendously in coastal North Carolina.

Impervious surfaces are developed areas such as roads, sidewalks, parking lots, rooftops, and construction sites that are impermeable; therefore, water does not soak through the surface. Instead, stormwater runs over the impervious surfaces, catches and concentrates contaminants, and washes them into drainage ditches or storm drains which lead to surface waters and beach areas.

Stormwater runoff is one of the greatest contributors to nutrient loading in surface waters. This type of nonpoint source pollution comes from the drainage in urban and suburban areas. As a result of N loadings, eutrophication has been described as the “single largest threat to the integrity of coastal ecosystems” (Song, et al., 2014).

Learn more about how stormwater pollution impacts local water quality and fisheries by clicking here.

Watch the documentary film showcasing the top five water quality impacts to coastal NC fisheries by clicking here.

ratio

type-01.png

 


CLICK ABOVE TO WATCH A SHORT VIDEO.
The CCRW Advocacy Working Group is currently working on local efforts to reduce stormwater runoff. Efforts include attending local meetings to advocate for low impact development and protecting natural heritage areas in need of conservation.

Learn more by clicking here.

Need a new years resolution?

Make the resolution to become a water quality advocate and consider donating to the cause!

BECOME AN ADVOCATE
Grey%20Fresh%20Oyster%20Promotion%20Menu%20A3%20Restaurant%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%282.5%20%C3%97%201.5%20in%29%20%28Facebook%20Post%20%28Landscape%29%29.png
Please consider being a part of the Waterkeeper Admiral Club with your sustaining donation of $1,000 or more.

Your donation goes directly to programming that protects the quality of water and quality of life in coastal North Carolina.

Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
2.png
3.png
4.png
5.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Harr.Logo.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

Growing Oyster Industry in NC

Posted on

CCRW_Logo_Final_blue.jpg

Growing Oyster Industry in NC

Screen%20Shot%202022-12-30%20at%201.15.30%20PM.png
Image: RYAN BETHEA, CCRW board member and owner/operator of Oysters Carolina.
Oysters in coastal North Carolina

Going into 2022, the oyster industry in North Carolina looked promising. Based on NCDEQ reports, oyster harvest numbers were at an all time high in 2021, with 232,016 bushels being collected by commercial fishers that year, and harvests seems to be continually growing. However, those who have oyster farms know the statewide trends aren’t always representative of individual farms and see first hand how variable harvest numbers can be year to year.

The summer of 2022 was hard for oyster farmers. Shellfish growers throughout coastal NC experienced multiple die-off events that spanned from southern Onslow through northern Carteret Counties. Farmed oysters seemed to be more impacted than wild populations and some sites lost up to 90% of their oysters.

What was unique about this year, is the geographic scope — and that across a large area, mortality events within individual estuaries all seemed to happen at the same time.” – Dr. Tal Ben-Horin, North Carolina State University Center for Marine Sciences and Technology’s Shellfish Pathology Laboratory

The heat and salinity in the summer seasons usually leads to some oyster mortality, but 2022 was more hot and dry than usual. The drought conditions being felt throughout the state led to less rain and higher salt levels in coastal waters. Oysters are sensitive to their environment. Water temperature, clarity and salinity, as well as pathogens and algae are some of the factors that can influence an oysters survivability and, in many places, waters can be stressed by multiple of these different factors that cause poor water quality. Because there are so many factors that influence oyster health, it can be difficult to identify what exactly causes a mortality event.

In September of 2022, CCRW responded to an algae bloom in the New River that could be seen from Stones Bay all the way down to Chadwicks Bay. This species hadn’t been seen before in this area but was known to harm shellfish in the Chesapeake Bay. Many shellfish farmers came to us reporting die-offs but even after investigating and working with research labs, we were unable to definitively know how this bloom impacted local oyster populations.

4ed01d5f-a031-49ed-a043-1b029024ef64.png
6c9c823c-6101-45ea-ae8d-f50cb0a1e53f.png
Image: CHARLES DUNCAN, Spectrum News 1. Raw, smoked or fried? The oyster industry is growing in North Carolina.
Oysters and other shellfish are a key part of our coastal ecosystem. They are incredible at filtering water and helping create an environment for other creatures to live in. They are also very important for stabilizing shorelines and improving clarity by settling particles out of the water column.

Many coastal areas are working to recover oyster populations and ensure healthy numbers so that industry and water quality can be supported in the future. The City of Jacksonville has been leading the Oyster Highway Project for over a decade and is continuing to expand reefs throughout the River.

CCRW helps to protect oyster populations and safe harvesting through boots on the ground water quality monitoring, investigations of pollution events, and reporting health concerns to the public and local authorities.

SAVE THE DATE:

CCRW Oyster Roast “Fun”draiser – Coming Soon!

This water quality “Shell”ebration is hosted by our friends and water quality advocates at Backstreet Pub in Beaufort NC.

This donation based event will take place on Sunday, January 22nd and starting at 3pm.

Come for live music, steamed local oysters, and hear from the Waterkeeper, Riley Lewis, about how our community works collaboratively to protect the quality of water and quality of life.

Grey%20Fresh%20Oyster%20Promotion%20Menu%20A3%20Restaurant%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%282.5%20%C3%97%201.5%20in%29.png
For more info about local water quality information, please contact:

Waterkeeper

Report a Water Quality Concern
WE NEED YOUR HELP!
Click Here to Support
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch
Programming and Services
Yellow%20Modern%20Warning%20Sign%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%20%28Landscape%29%29.png
A recent Bird Flu is impacting our local wildlife. There have been recent reports of dead birds in the Sneads Ferry / Topsail area.

Please DO NOT TOUCH!

If you find significant numbers of dead birds, you should report the finding to either NCDA&CS or NC Wildlife Resources Commission. NC Wildlife Helpline at 866-318-2401, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., or email HWI@ncwildlife.org, or call USDA at 866-536-7593.

Please consider being a part of the Waterkeeper Admiral Club with your sustaining donation of $1,000 or more.

Your donation goes directly to programming that protects the quality of water and quality of life in coastal North Carolina.

Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
2.png
3.png
4.png
5.png
Become a Member
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

“Forever Chemicals” Research in Coastal NC Waters

Posted on

Image

“Forever Chemicals” Research in Coastal NC Waters

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, known as “PFAS” are a group of chemicals that are used in non-stick cookware, stain repellent, waterproof coatings, and many other manufacturing processes. PFAS have been in use since the 1940s and there are thousands of types of PFAS, according to the USEPA.

These “forever chemicals” accumulate in people, wildlife, and the environment. PFAS have been found in surface water, air, soil, food, and many commercial materials. PFAS are widely linked to serious health conditions such as cancer, liver and kidney disease, reproductive issues, immunodeficiencies, and hormonal disruptions.

Known PFAS sources include:

  • Soil and Water at, near, and downstream of Disposal Sites (Landfills)
  • Facilities that use Fire Fighting Foam (Airports, Shipyards, Municipal Fire Training Facilities, Military Bases, Refineries and Chemical Plants)
  • PFAS Manufacturing Facilities
  • Food Contaminated by PFAS (Fish, Livestock,)
  • Food Packaging
  • Household Products
  • Dust
  • Personal Care Products
  • Biosolids from Wastewater Treatment Plants
  • Drinking Water and Surface Waters

SOURCE: USEPA, 2022, epa.gov/pfas

b81c7223-664f-410c-a645-8d549dc794a2.jpg
376efd78-fa82-43fc-83f7-7e630628de3c.jpg
PHOTO: Riley Lewis, White Oak Waterkeeper collecting surface water downstream of the Onslow County Landfill, RIDER 2022
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch is participating in a statewide PFAS study in surface waters downstream of potential PFAS sources.

CCRW has taken the following downstream surface water samples:

  • New River Marine Air Station on the SW Creek
  • Bogue Sound by the Marine Landing Field
  • Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) outfall off Taylors creek in Beaufort
  • Newport River downstream of the Newport WWTP outfall
  • Blue Creek in Jacksonville, downstream of the Onslow Landfill

These samples will be analyzed by Cyclopure and sent to CCRW for a comprehensive report on contamination in NC. The data will be used to inform communities of potential contamination and exposure and can be used to pursue PFAS regulations in NC.

It’s really important to be testing for these chemicals all around the White Oak River Basin. We need to get a better idea of how widespread PFAS contamination is and make sure communities aren’t being heavily impacted. So much is unknown about the true danger of these chemicals and serious work needs to be done to keep them out of our environment.” – Riley Lewis, White Oak Waterkeeper.

To learn more and follow this and other PFAS research, Click Here.

d677079a-91a5-4122-b93a-6fdd7e2591d5.jpg
060cca35-56ae-4c35-9b2e-d230afcf7091.jpg
PHOTO: Lisa Rider, ED, collecting surface water downstream of Bogue Air Field, W.RIDER 2022
Despite serious health risks, there are currently no universal, science-based limits on the various PFAS chemicals in the United States.

For many PFAS chemicals, the EPA has not even set a health advisory limit that would give the public a baseline to determine what amount of PFAS is unhealthy in drinking water. In most cases, the EPA is not doing adequate monitoring for these chemicals, which is why these findings are so unique and important.

Your support can help turn PFAS legislation into a reality. Contact your Members of Congress today in support of this urgently needed legislation.

Want to support additional PFAS sampling in coastal NC, collaborative community-based advocacy and outreach efforts? Click to donate today.

Report a Water Quality Concern
For more info about local water quality information, please contact:

Riley Lewis, White Oak Waterkeeper

RileyL

Beach%20Photo%20.jpg
Love this Weekly Newsletter?
WE NEED YOUR HELP to keep it going!
Click Here to Support
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch
Programming and Services
Yellow%20Modern%20Warning%20Sign%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%20%28Landscape%29%29.png
A recent Bird Flu is impacting our local wildlife. There have been recent reports of dead birds in the Sneads Ferry / Topsail area.

Please DO NOT TOUCH!

If you find significant numbers of dead birds, you should report the finding to either NCDA&CS or NC Wildlife Resources Commission. NC Wildlife Helpline at 866-318-2401, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., or email HWI@ncwildlife.org, or call USDA at 866-536-7593.

Need a new years resolution?

Make the resolution to become a water quality advocate and consider donating to the cause!

BECOME AN ADVOCATE
Wastelands.png
Wastelands%20%281%29.png
Grey%20Fresh%20Oyster%20Promotion%20Menu%20A3%20Restaurant%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%282.5%20%C3%97%201.5%20in%29.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Please consider being a part of the Waterkeeper Admiral Club with your sustaining donation of $1,000 or more.

Your donation goes directly to programming that protects the quality of water and quality of life in coastal North Carolina.

Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
2.png
3.png
4.png
5.png
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

Our Waters Bring Comfort and Joy

Posted on

CCRW_Logo_Final_blue.jpg

Our Waters

Bring Comfort and Joy

Image
PHOTO: Riley Lewis and Jan Farmer, CCRW Board Vice President 2022
As we wrap up the year, we want to highlight the joys of being close to the water. From rivers and streams to lakes and sounds, water has always been an important part of life along coastal North Carolina.

“I have been thinking about how lucky I am to be living by the coast and have access to so many resources provided by the water. Fresh seafood, fun water activities, and the natural environment is so important to me. I have always lived close to a coastal river system and can’t imagine not being able to hear the sound of flowing water just a short walk away.” – Riley, White Oak Waterkeeper

65609525-984c-4049-812e-8350ad8907b2.png
PHOTO: Riley Lewis, S. LEAH 2022
Your health and being on the water:

Water quality’s impact on human health has been observed for generations, and research continues to try and understand how being on, in, or by the water can be so good for your physical and mental wellbeing.

Being by the water, especially natural waters like rivers and oceans, has been shown to lower blood pressure, decrease stress, bring on relaxation, improve creativity, and bring about a general sense of happiness.

To those who have livelihoods directly associated with natural waters, good water quality brings additional benefits and peace of mind.

IMG_0624.jpg
PHOTO: L. Rider, Gulf Steam/Atlantic Ocean, J. ANDRE 2021
“I was born and raised along the banks of coastal NC and feel lucky and proud to have lived by the sea my entire life. That pride comes with responsibility. The responsibility to protect all that I have enjoyed these many years.

One of the best perks of living by the sea is having the opportunity to experience life under the water. Free-diving and SCUBA diving provides another method of coastal exploration and can be great for your physical and mental health. Being under the water provides an escape from the chatter of modern life, while taking in the abundance of life and constant reminder of how important these ecosystems are to life in coastal NC.

Living near the water has its perks like fresh salty air, access to sandy beaches, fresh local coastal foods, and learning how to navigate the waters by motor, paddle, or sail. All of these perks are in jeopardy, without water quality protection.

One of the best things about living on the coast is being a part of the coastal community. I am grateful for this community that recognizes we are all responsible for protecting the quality of water and life here in our community environment.

Lisa, Executive Director

IMG_0622.jpg
PHOTO: L.Rider, Gulf Steam/Atlantic Ocean, J. ANDRE 2021
While being on, in, or by the water can be good for your mental and physical health, it is important for that water to be good quality.

Communities with poor water quality or that struggle with pollution are physically and mentally impacted.

As coastal areas are developed, it is important that the health and preservation of our natural waters Stress from water insecurity or impacts to livelihoods are always a threat but can be avoided with strong water monitoring and advocacy.

Reduced pollution in waterways is not only is good for you physically, but can ease any anxiety about your surroundings.

At Coastal Carolina Riverwatch, we are honored to be your local water quality organization that works to protect the quality of water and quality of life in our community. See everything we have done for water quality in 2022 here and stay tuned for what we have planned in 2023.

IMG_0625.jpg
PHOTO: L.RIDER 2021
Need a new years resolution?

Make the resolution to become a water quality advocate and consider donating to the cause!

BECOME AN ADVOCATE
For more info about local water quality information, please contact:

Waterkeeper

WE NEED YOUR HELP!
Click Here to Support
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch
Programming and Services
Wastelands.png
Wastelands%20%281%29.png
Grey%20Fresh%20Oyster%20Promotion%20Menu%20A3%20Restaurant%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%282.5%20%C3%97%201.5%20in%29.png
Please consider being a part of the Waterkeeper Admiral Club with your sustaining donation of $1,000 or more.

Your donation goes directly to programming that protects the quality of water and quality of life in coastal North Carolina.

Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
2.png
3.png
4.png
5.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

Waterways without Wastewater

Posted on

Waterways without Wastewater

CCRW_Logo_Final_blue%20%281%29.png
Waterways without Wastewater
Municipal-Wastewater-Final%20%283%29.jpg
GRAPHIC: N. WEAVER, 2021
Wastewater treatment systems are one of the US’s most widely-used pollution control technologies in the US. These systems’ treatment process includes sewers collecting wastewater, transporting the water to treatment plants, completing a cleaning process, and finally discharging the wastewater.

Municipal wastewater treatment plants, also referred to as publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), filter physical, chemical, and biological pollutants from the wastewater received from households, businesses, and industries. Differing from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, about 50% of homes in North Carolina use on-site wastewater systems, or septic systems (EPA, 2017). They generally have a tank, a distribution box, and subsurface absorption lines with perforated pipes laid in a gravel bed. On-site wastewater systems provide an alternative, natural way to treat and dispose of domestic waste without being connected to a centralized municipal sewage treatment system.

Major water quality concerns associated with untreated or poorly treated wastewater entering water systems include high levels of dangerous bacteria, hazardous materials, elevated total suspended solids, pharmaceuticals, and excess nutrients. Population centers contribute greatly to the amount of daily loads entering bodies of water from POTWs. Inflow and Infiltration (I & I) is a severe water quality implication resulting in the pollution of estuarine waters by raw wastewater. Inflow occurs during storm events when stormwater surges into and overwhelms a sewage collection and treatment system. Infiltration is the process of groundwater entering a sewer pipe system through uncapped sewer line cleanouts, gutters connected to lateral sewer lines, inadequate sewer manhole covers, and cross connections of stormwater lines with sanitary sewer lines (Deaton, et al., 2021). Sewer pipes also receive infiltrated groundwater through faulty pipe joints, sewer pipe cracks, broken manholes, and collapsed lateral pipes.

Coastal North Carolina faces more challenges with wastewater treatment systems failing due to sea level rise, more frequent and severe king tides, higher rainfall amounts, and seasonal temperature effects on groundwater levels (Allen, 2019).

Pump stations and wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are built to receive specific peak flow volumes and rates which can be exceeded with the increased flow from I & I. With a higher risk of overflow, there is also an elevated risk of untreated waters being released from a WWTP. Additionally, communities, especially those home to low-income citizens, often do not have adequate financial resources to maintain and update wastewater infrastructure. Lowincome counties face challenges with a lack of federal funding and the expenses of infrastructure upkeep and replacement, contributing to a greater risk of sanitary sewer overflows (Deaton, et al., 2021).

Sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) and the resulting water pollution, are generally the effects of failed wastewater infrastructure. During an SSO, the spill may consist of hundreds to millions of gallons of sewage overflow that contain dangerous pollutants (Deaton, et al., 2021). The implications of these malfunctions on water quality include algal blooms resulting from nutrient loading, increased bacteria and toxin levels, fish kills, and contaminated sediments. In addition to the depletion of available oxygen, algal blooms can lead to the release of hydrogen sulphide and ammonia, both potentially toxic to aquatic life in low concentrations. (Shahidul, 2004).

The NC DEQ, Division of Water Resources, just announced the launch of a new GIS reporting application aiming to increase awareness of recently reported SSOs.

As a result of water quality advocates, DWR developed an online mapping tool to help better identify where these SSOs were occurring, volume spilled, and proximity to recreational waters. The app highlights the most recent spills which have occurred in the last 7 days through a graduated blue dot based on estimated volume, as well as continue to collect and add data on a rolling calendar basis.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE SSO DATA.

Waterkeepers from across the State of North Carolina have been advocating for this for several years, after several spills and sewer overflows happened in their watersheds.

Hartwell Carson, French Broad Riverkeeper, works with CCRW White Oak Waterkeeper, notified the coalition group of the new system last week. Hartwell mention that the group “realized the current public notice was widely outdated, as it only provides a press release several days after the spill. This potentially leaves people recreating in polluted waters.”

MountainTrue, CCRW, and several other Waterkeeper groups across the state, advocated for change to the reporting system. These changes help to modernize access to the information to the public. The Division of Water Resources did the heavy lifting of making it happen within the Department and we are grateful that DEQ has taken this step forward. We are hopeful that other reporting methods will have similar updates forthcoming. We also hope this will be a good tool for the public to make informed decisions that further push the reduction of sewer overflows across the state.

Screen%20Shot%202022-12-13%20at%209.22.19%20AM.png
As part of the Water Quality for Fisheries Program, wasterwater has been prioritized as one of the top five water quality concerns that impact fisheries.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE WQ4F PROGRAM.

During the first year of the Water Quality for Fisheries Program, a statewide assessment on wastewater impacts to water quality and fisheries.

CHICK HERE TO ACCESS THE WASTEWATER ASSESSMENT.

CCRW is working with local partners and stakeholders to develop a comprehensive Waterways without Wastewater program for coastal NC. If you would like to volunteer as a stakeholder or partner on this program, please contact Waterkeeper

Support CCRW

Waterways without Wastewater Programming

DONATE NOW
8231BE32-3742-4341-8029-F12FAD03F5F7_1.JPG
For more info about local water quality information, please contact:

Waterkeeper

Report a Water Quality Concern
Wastelands.png
Wastelands%20%281%29.png
Grey%20Fresh%20Oyster%20Promotion%20Menu%20A3%20Restaurant%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%282.5%20%C3%97%201.5%20in%29.png
Be part of the Waterkeeper Admiral Club with your donation of $1,000 or more.

Click here to learn more.

Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
2.png
3.png
4.png
5.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

Pure Farms, Pure Waters – Legislative Agenda for CAFOs in 2023

Posted on

Image
Pure Farms, Pure Waters

CCRW Legislative Agenda for CAFOs in 2023

Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been a topic of environmental concern for many years but have recently caught the spotlight through the many articles and research that are being released throughout North Carolina.

CCRW has been observing CAFOs and holding them accountable for many years. These concentrated hog and poultry farms are harmful to the environment, North Carolina water quality, and communities that live anywhere close to the facilities. We will continue fighting for the quality of water and quality of life in 2023 and will support policies that help our cause.

IMG_0150.JPG
PHOTO: LEWIS, 2022 – Aerial photograph of CAFOs and housing communities scattered throughout the landscape. Photo was taken around the Town of Richlands in NC.
As 2023 approaches, CCRW is collecting our list of legislative priorities that will guide our CAFO work in the new year. We want to see more oversight and transparency of CAFOs and funding to support farmers and best practices.

Here is our current 2023 Legislative Agenda for CAFOs:

  • Funding for the Swine Farm Buyout Program – The swine farm buyout is a voluntary program that was established in the wake of Hurricane Floyd to remove swine farms from the 100-year floodplain.
  • Oversight of the Poultry Industry – The poultry industry in North Carolina has little regulation, which leads to unchecked amounts of nutrients and bacteria from these facilities polluting our state’s waterways.
  • Poultry Study Bill – To understand the impacts of poultry waste on our state waterways.
  • Animal Agriculture Resilience Planning –To remove facilities within the 100 year floodplain and prevent new construction of facilities within the 500 year floodplain.
  • Nutrient Waste Utilization Plans – To be submitted to DEQ for approval and prohibit land application of poultry waste within 100 ft of surface waters.
  • Increase Funding for Soil and Water Cost-Share Programs – The Agricultural Cost Share Program typically receives as much as $20 million in requests for $4 million in annual funding statewide.
  • Livestock exclusion from waterways – We suggest establishing an annually recurring fund to help farmers install livestock exclusion fencing and alternative water sources.
  • Move state water quality standards from fecal coliform to E.coli for all freshwaters– North Carolina is one of only four states that have yet to transition to E.coli as a pathogen indicator. EPA made this change in 1986. In March, 2022, the Environmental Management Commission committed to transitioning on an expedited timeline.
  • The use of a point system for reoccurring permit violations – Farms that are continually in violation of their permits will accrue points depending on the violation. After a certain number of points, the operation must stop until they are within compliance.

READ MORE ABOUT CCRW WORK TO ADDRESS CAFO CONCERNS.

4f9bac2c-3bd6-4579-9886-2e88cebfbcc0.png
PHOTO: EWG, 2022 – Map of known Poultry and Swine CAFOs in Carteret and Onslow Counties. View map.

STATEWIDE COVERAGE ON POULTRY CAFOS:

If you are not following the statewide coverage of Poultry CAFOs in North Carolina, please take a look at the series being released by the N&O and the Charlotte Observer:

With little oversight, NC poultry farms raise 1 billion birds a year. Who pays the cost?

With no power to fend off poultry farms, neighbors live with stench and nuisances.

As part of the Pure Farms Pure Water campaign, CCRW calls attention to these destructive practices, advocate for environmental laws, and support traditional family farms.

Coastal Carolina Riverwatch wants to see poultry CAFO’s regulated by the NC Department of Environmental Quality. Without proper regulation and enforcement, large facilities that produce as much waste as a large city will continue to pollute Coastal Carolina’s waterways and threaten our quality of water and quality of life.

This holiday season please consider supporting a small, local farm when searching for pork or poultry products. Small efforts like these, help our community businesses and help protect water quality in your back yard.

*ACTION ALERT*

Though many CAFOs cannot be seen from the road, please keep an eye out for any hog lagoons or uncovered dry litter piles that look (or smell) off and let the White Oak Waterkeeper know!

Report a Water Quality Concern
Want to learn more about how CAFOs impact our coastal community?

Join the Advocacy Book Club in reading “Wastelands: The True Story of Farm Country on Trial”.

Join the community in screening “The Smell of Money” at the Beaufort Picture Show – Mill Whistle Brewery in Beaufort.

Join the community in a book signing event with Corbin Addison and Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

Join the community Advocacy Working Group – Click Here to Sign Up Today!

Movie%20Night%20Flyer%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%28Business%20Card%29%20%281%29.png
Stack%20of%20Books%20Flyer%20%281%29.png
WE NEED YOUR HELP!
Click Here to Support
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch
Programming and Services
ACHIEVEMENTS in 2022:

Through Coastal Carolina Riverwatch’s boots-on-the-ground rapid response program we have documented significant water quality problems that threaten human health and aquatic life and utilize that information to increase awareness and support for improved policies. We conduct research and use facilitated collaborative methods to engage advocates, scientists, industry, government, and other stakeholders to provide top-down prioritized gaps-in-service programming for the communities in coastal NC.

Click here for updates to the full 2022 Achievements.

Become A Member Today – Click Here!
Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

Water Quality for Fisheries: Industrial Agriculture and Factory Farming Impacts

Posted on

Image
Water Quality for Fisheries:

Industrial Agriculture and

Factory Farming Impacts

71ce2f9c-ceb4-4c2c-b264-3cd4f9ba04cc.png

ratio

type-01.png

 


CLICK ABOVE TO WATCH A SHORT VIDEO.
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch’s Water Quality for Fisheries Program includes a coalition of recreational and commercial fishermen and women that work to identify, prioritize, and tackle actions that protect the quality of water and quality of life in coastal NC. During the WQ4F survey, those who fish on the coast of NC identified industrial agriculture and factory farming as the number one priority focus for reducing water quality impacts to fisheries. The excess nutrients, from these facilities, cause eutrophication, habitat destruction, and algal blooms that block sunlight from reaching aquatic vegetation.

Algal blooms may contain toxic microorganisms such as a Pfiesteria which has contributed to public health issues and fish being plagued with large sores. These factors have caused massive fish kills in NC waters including species such as minnows, gar, largemouth bass, striped bass, and flounder.

Runoff from these facilities can also lead to the presence of fecal bacteria or pathogens in surface water. Fecal bacterial pathogens that can cause human health problems and may lead to shellfish collection restrictions.

IMG_6980.JPG
PHOTO: RIDER, 2022

STATEWIDE COVERAGE ON POULTRY CAFOS:

With little oversight, NC poultry farms raise 1 billion birds a year. Who pays the cost?

With no power to fend off poultry farms, neighbors live with stench and nuisances.

NEW PODCAST – This week on the Under the Dome politics podcast, host Dawn Vaughan talks with the main reporting team behind a project by The News & Observer and The Charlotte Observer, “Big Poultry.” Plus a sneak peek of what’s to come in their coverage.

READ MORE ABOUT INDUSTRIAL AGRICULTURE AND FACTORY FARMING IMPACTS TO FISHERIES.

READ MORE ABOUT CCRW WORK TO ADDRESS CAFO CONCERNS.

READ MORE ABOUT RECENT HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS IN COASTAL NC.

IMG_0354.jpeg
PHOTO: LEWIS, 2022 – Dry litter piles sitting outside between the right two poultry barns.
As part of the Pure Farms Pure Water campaign, CCRW calls attention to these destructive practices, advocate for environmental laws, and support traditional family farms.

Coastal Carolina Riverwatch wants to see poultry CAFO’s regulated by the NC Department of Environmental Quality. Without proper regulation and enforcement, large facilities that produce as much waste as a large city will continue to pollute Coastal Carolina’s waterways and threaten our quality of water and quality of life.

This holiday season please consider supporting a small, local farm when searching for pork or poultry products. Small efforts like these, help our community businesses and help protect water quality in your back yard.

*ACTION ALERT*

Though many CAFOs cannot be seen from the road, please keep an eye out for any hog lagoons or uncovered dry litter piles that look (or smell) off and let the White Oak Waterkeeper know!

Report a Water Quality Concern
Want to learn more about how CAFOs impact our coastal community?

Join the Advocacy Book Club in reading “Wastelands: The True Story of Farm Country on Trial”.

Join the community in screening “The Smell of Money” at the Beaufort Picture Show – Mill Whistle Brewery in Beaufort.

Join the community in a book signing event with Corbin Addison and Coastal Carolina Riverwatch at Promise Land Market on Thursday, January 12th at 5:30pm.

Join the community Advocacy Working Group – Click Here to Sign Up Today!

Movie%20Night%20Flyer%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%28Business%20Card%29%20%281%29.png
Stack%20of%20Books%20Flyer%20%281%29.png
WE NEED YOUR HELP!
Click Here to Support
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch
Programming and Services
ACHIEVEMENTS in 2022:

Through Coastal Carolina Riverwatch’s boots-on-the-ground rapid response program we have documented significant water quality problems that threaten human health and aquatic life and utilize that information to increase awareness and support for improved policies. We conduct research and use facilitated collaborative methods to engage advocates, scientists, industry, government, and other stakeholders to provide top-down prioritized gaps-in-service programming for the communities in coastal NC.

Click here for updates to the full 2022 Achievements.

Become A Member Today – Click Here!
Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

Give Local this #GivingTuesday!

Posted on

Give Local this #GivingTuesday!

CCRW_Logo_Final_blue%20logo.jpg
Through Coastal Carolina Riverwatch’s boots-on-the-ground rapid response program we have documented significant water quality problems that threaten human health and aquatic life and utilize that information to increase awareness and support for improved policies. We conduct research and use facilitated collaborative methods to engage advocates, scientists, industry, government, and other stakeholders to provide top-down prioritized gaps-in-service programming for the communities in coastal NC.
402EDE4C-C25F-459B-9810-0AF4E19E359B.JPG
Accomplishments (so far) in 2022:
  • CCRW staff has developed, written, and published a weekly newsletter to over 2,500 subscribers.This newsletter brings attention to water quality concerns and actions at the coast. Sign up, click here.
  • Investigated significant pollution events and published outreach content to a social media audience of over 20,000 per month and 2,500 newsletter subscribers.
  • Investigated potential pollution events in the White Oak River Basin from Cedar Island to Hampstead. Major events include potential pollution events from stormwater runoff in several developments, PFAS research in areas of significant concern and including Statewide and National research on PFAS in surface waters, plastics research in collaboration with a Statewide coalition project, and finding, investigating, and reporting on a significant harmful algae bloom in the lower New River.
  • Advocated for the protection of coastal habitat, water quality, and quality of life by providing comments on legislation, policies, regulations, and local planning and development activities.
  • Created and sustain gaps-in-service programming that protects water quality:
    • Wetlands Wednesdays, (NEW IN 2022)
      • Focus on educating the public on wetland science and eco benefits as well as anthropogenic. Types and sub-types, threats, locations and news in video, and image format.
    • Pure Farms, Pure Waters, (UPDATED IN 2022)
      • This work encompasses a comprehensive long-term strategy to create a just food system that does not damage water or communities.
      • Achievements for this program in 2022:
        • Continued this work in 2022 without additional funding from Waterkeeper Alliance.
        • Documented pollution and reported the impacts of CAFOs
        • Slowed the proliferation of directed biogas projects.
        • Supported funding and mechanisms for buyout of swine and poultry operations in the floodplain.
        • Building groundwork to achieve permitting for poultry operations.
        • Conducted water monitoring in waterways adjacent to CAFOs.
        • Advocated for more protective water standards.
        • Utilized DNA tracking to identify pollution sources
        • Provided support to communities being impacted by CAFOs.
        • Provided support to local sustainable farms and farmers.
        • Submitted 5 in 30 sample report data to the State for reclassification of waterbody (upper New River).
Water Quality

for Fisheries

Accomplishments

(so far) in 2022:

d1791a55-9caa-430e-b240-d9a2636abafb.png
IMG_6980.JPG
Fred%20Taylor%27s%20Mother.png
IMG_6477.jpg
8773F3A2-33FF-4B9F-BE57-E956D07C20B4.JPG
unnamed-1.jpg
fishing%20vessel.jpeg
IMG_9423.jpg
Water Quality for Fisheries (WQ4F), (NEW IN 2021)

This work encompasses a comprehensive long-term strategy to study and advocate for water quality protection measures in coastal communities.

Achievements for this program in 2022:

  • Collaborated and communicated with fisheries representatives to address concerns about how water quality impacts fisheries and next steps on prioritized project development.
  • Collectively learned (from the WQ4F Assessment Process) what is currently being done in the State to address water quality issues impacting fisheries and use the information to develop prioritized project proposals to fund ongoing research and outreach efforts that will protect water quality for fisheries.
  • Collaboratively made recommendations on what more needs to be done to improve water quality for fisheries.
  • Proposed next steps that address gaps in addressing what is not currently being done to address water quality issues.
  • Submitted three project proposals in 2022 to fund further WQ4F work.
  • Screened the WQ4F Film “Tidal Alert” several times in-person and virtually in 2022 with an estimated audience of +5,000 people in 2022.
  • Developed the Algae Bloom Response project in collaboration with commercial and recreational fishermen participating in the WQ4F program.
  • Water Quality for Fisheries Prioritized Actions Items in 2022:
  • Industrial Agriculture and Factory Farming Pollution:
  • Advocated for updated waste management systems for industrial agriculture and factory farming practices.
  • Advocated for improving the requirements for pre-storm preparation.
  • Worked to bridge the gap between scientists and policymakers.

Stormwater Pollution:

  • Advocated for the implementation of sustainable development techniques (wetland and forest protection, permeable surfaces, increased vegetated areas, on-site runoff treatment technologies).
  • Advocated for green infrastructure policy development (standardize the use of permeable pavement, green streets, filtration systems, and nature-based infrastructure).
  • Enhanced the monitoring of stormwater runoff.
  • Publicized successful stormwater control efforts.

Industrial Pollution:

  • Advocated for the reduction of industrial activities that utilize harmful industrial chemicals in their process and the development of new filtration technologies.
  • Advocated for policies that enforces the maximum contaminant levels for municipal water treatment facilities.
  • Increased education efforts providing information to consumers on PFAS-containing products.

Plastic Pollution:

  • Advocated for changes in the manufacturing process of plastics that prevent plastic pollution.
  • Advocated for single-use plastic-bans and extended producer responsibility.
  • Advocate for the research of green chemistry (alternatives to current chemical composition of plastic) and research the physiological effects of plastic on fish.

Wastewater Pollution:

  • Advocated for preventative repairs and updates on current infrastructure.
  • Advocated for the establishment of water quality standards for additional wastewater pollutants, including plastics and industrial chemicals.
  • Worked with researchers to understand wastewater treatment infrastructure for coastal regions, with high water tables and flooding, to determine effective best management practices for reducing wastewater pollution.
  • Increased community outreach support for improving wastewater treatment infrastructure.
Additional

Accomplishments

(so far) in 2022:

e1878103-7d38-49de-96cc-f5c231fe51a0.png
  • Equity in the Environment, (NEW IN 2021)
    • Provided a $1,000 scholarship to one student in 2022.
  • Algae Bloom Response Project, (NEW IN 2022)
    • Responded to Rust Tide (Harmful Algae Bloom on New River) from September 2022 – October 2022)
    • Weekly investigation by water and air.
    • SouthWings partnership (donated flights) for fly-over investigation.
    • Citizen science (Advocacy Team – click here to join) drone investigation.
    • Waterkeeper algae identification, reporting, and local notification (news media, boots-on-the-ground, and through connections with the local fishing community).
  • PFAS Research and Outreach in Coastal NC, (NEW in 2022)
    • CCRW participated in multiple research projects on PFAS in coastal NC in 2022.
    • PFAS – National Study (White Oak River)
    • PFAS – NC Study (New River, Bogue Sound, Newport River, and North River)
    • PFAS in Foam
  • Advocacy Book Club. (NEW IN 2022)
  • Micro-plastics Research (NEW IN 2022)
    • CCRW participated in a Statewide micro-plastics research in 2022-23.
    • Provided information to increase participation in government actions.
  • NC Plastic Policy Workshop (NEW IN 2022)
  • NC Marine Debris Symposium (NEWLY ADDED POLICY WORKSHOP IN 2022)
    • Participated in and facilitated public speaking engagements on local government actions.
  • We take legal action on behalf of communities when necessary and when legal representation is available:
  • Address Impacts of Environmental Hazards to Human Health.
  • Pure Farms Pure Waters: Continue our efforts to hold the industrial hog and poultry operations accountable.

Learn more about our accomplishments (so far) and keep posted here for updates.

c1dae60a-97b2-4ddf-b92b-2b0f2585d568.jpg
IMG_6345%203.JPG
87257070-1657-4d6d-a3cb-a5cf94e0f74f.JPG
IMG_0354.jpeg
028ADB6C-F670-4406-97F7-2DA72EED72D7%202.JPG

Love how we work for the water and our community?

Help us fund another year of water quality and community advocacy services by giving today.

Click this link for #GivingTuesday donations. Recurring donations will be matched.

657DB2CA-3929-4473-8B19-FC49DC2601C6.PNG
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

Poultry Farm Aerial Investigations

Posted on

Image

Poultry Farm Aerial Investigations

Our White Oak Waterkeeper recently went on a flight with SouthWings pilot, Rolf, to observe Poultry and Hog Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs). The goal of the flight was to identify farms in the White Oak River Basin and look for permit violations that can lead to contamination in waterways.

SouthWings is a nonprofit conservation organization that provides a network of volunteer pilots to advocate for the restoration and protection of ecosystems across the Southeast through flight. Partnerships with SouthWings provides unique opportunities to our own small nonprofit that allow the White Oak Waterkeeper to better observe pollution and assess water quality in our complex network of creeks and rivers.

3959ef60-46f7-4582-81e1-e78036068dbf.jpg
PHOTO: DOVE, 2022 – SouthWings volunteer pilot, Rolf (Right) and White Oak Waterkeeper, Riley (Left).
The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality defines a Poultry CAFO as a feeding operation where at least30,000 chickens are housed. CAFOs, or factory farms, are massive, windowless, production facilities where animals are confined in crates or stalls without access to sunshine, fresh air, or natural vegetation.

Poultry operations in North Carolina that use dry waste systems (dry litter poultry operations) are not required to obtain permits from the Division of Water Resources. However, while these operations are not required to apply for permits, they must follow general requirements as outlined in statutes and rules. Following are the first two requirements for all dry litter operations over 30,000 birds.

1. Litter shall not be stockpiled within 100 feet of perennial streams, waterbodies, or wells.

2. Stockpiled litter shall not be left uncovered for more than 15 days.

Other requirements can be read here.

Poultry waste, mixed with bedding and carcasses is stored in large piles that, when left uncovered, can easily be blown away by wind. And though this waste storage method is called “dry litter” it still contains liquid waste that can drain out of the pile and into adjacent waterways.

This discharge is entering our waterways, causing fecal bacteria contamination and loading nutrients into rivers and streams. On top of that, many of these operations were built in areas prone to flooding. This makes water unsafe to recreate in and can cause harmful algal blooms and fish kills. Communities surrounding these facilities are impacted with diminished quality of life due to overwhelming odors and health complications from air and water pollution. Check out our Water Quality for Fisheries program for more information on CAFO pollution.

IMG_0354.jpeg
PHOTO: LEWIS, 2022 – Dry litter piles sitting outside between the right two poultry barns.
North Carolina is the number one largest swine producer and third largest poultry producer in the nation, but with the rapid construction of new poultry facilities, our rank may climb.

Most hog and poultry CAFOs in the White Oak Water Basin are located in and around the Town of Richlands but specific locations of poultry CAFOs are not readily known. Because of the limited regulations, the NCDEQ does not have information on the location or waste disposal practices of many of these industrial-scale chicken and turkey farms.

Poultry CAFOs can be identified by the long barns that hold the birds and a shed used to cover and store the waste piles. This is different than the hog CAFOs that have large liquid waste lagoons adjacent to long barns. Pictured below is a poultry farm in the middle and a hog farm in the upper right corner.

IMG_0328.JPG
PHOTOS: LEWIS, 2022 – A poultry CAFO (Left) and Hog CAFO (Upper right).
As part of the Pure Farms Pure Water campaign, CCRW calls attention to these destructive practices, advocate for environmental laws, and support traditional family farms.

Coastal Carolina Riverwatch wants to see poultry CAFO’s regulated by the NC Department of Environmental Quality. Without proper regulation and enforcement, large facilities that produce as much waste as a large city will continue to pollute Coastal Carolina’s waterways and threaten our quality of water and quality of life.

This holiday season please consider supporting a small, local farm when searching for pork or poultry products. Small efforts like these, help our community businesses and help protect water quality in your back yard.

*ACTION ALERT*

Though many CAFOs cannot be seen from the road, please keep an eye out for any hog lagoons or uncovered dry litter piles that look (or smell) off and let the White Oak Waterkeeper know!

Riley Lewis,

White Oak Waterkeeper – Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

RileyL

Report a Water Quality Concern
96f8fe5b-8bca-4f71-bdfa-909a0eeb241e.jpg
Untitled%20%281%29.jpg
CCRW Donation Website
Please consider being a part of the Waterkeeper Admiral Club with your sustaining donation of $1,000 or more.

Your donation goes directly to programming that protects the quality of water and quality of life in coastal North Carolina.

Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
Grey%20Fresh%20Oyster%20Promotion%20Menu%20A3%20Restaurant%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%282.5%20%C3%97%201.5%20in%29.png
Stack%20of%20Books%20Flyer%20%281%29.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram

‘Tis the Season for Water Quality

Posted on

‘Tis the Season for Water Quality

Image
‘TIS THE SEASON TO SUPPORT

LOCAL WATER QUALITY

DONATE NOW
Image
IMG_9317.JPG
86aefc07-86b5-454f-87d7-c78bccca009e.jpg
c6658f45-fb9a-4780-8994-c23437f19c77.jpg
Photo_6554558_DJI_958_jpg_6227290_0_202292613038_photo_original%202.JPG
84ecc6d5-da9a-4319-aef2-afb2842c28d5.jpg
IMG_9232.JPG
File_000-3.png
Lee.jpg
Image
IMG_0335.jpg
IMG_9231.jpg
c7f82896-21cd-4548-afde-d0bf2e20d5c1.jpg
IMG_4156.jpg
7ae44a16-ef75-48e9-a1ec-3c9926abcbb1.JPG
a718741c-0a86-477c-8645-78072f0b986d.JPG
19fedf90-d25c-4d0a-a21e-0eb9b9ce72f3.jpg
Group%20Photo%20CCRW%202022%20Film%20Screening%20_1.png
A holiday message from CCRW Crew Member,

Lisa Rider

IMG_9370.jpg
Thank you for your support of our collaborative community work for the water.

This time of year, we reflect on what we are most grateful for; family, friends, access to food, access to fresh water, and the comforts of coastal community heritage and home.

I too am thankful for these things, and like you I am grateful and proud to be a coastal NC citizen, but with that pride comes responsibility. The responsibility to protect the quality of water and life for now and future generations.

I am honored to work for the water and for our community.”

My favorite local seasonal food this year is Sweet Potatoes from

Ocean Farm Natural Organic Farm in Bogue, NC.

My favorite free experience is hiking the Croatan Forest (Neusiok and Weetok Trails).

My favorite cost experience is SCUBA diving with Sandtiger Sharks at Offshore Wreck Sites with Olympus Dive Center

My favorite local gifts to give are from local markets and experiences that facilitate the enjoyment of our coastal community environment (bird and bat houses, food and travel, locally designed and inspired, locally made art and classes).

My favorite local places to connect with water, this year, are Bear Island, part of Hammocks Beach State Park near Swansboro, NC and Springer’s Point in Ocracoke, NC

Stay Fresh and Salty this Holiday Season!

A holiday message from CCRW Crew Member,

Riley Lewis

cba838c8-8a3d-4389-839b-43aa7c62ef26.jpg
I am so thankful to be living on the coast and being able to wake up each morning surrounded by the rivers, sounds and ocean that I work to protect. There is something special about being in humid coastal air that brings out the warmth in the people who live there. The strong women that I work with put their heart and soul into protecting our water quality and I am so thankful to be a part of such a great organization

My favorite local food is the Pound Cake from The Friendly Market.

My favorite local free experience is exploring the trails and beach of Fort Macon State Park.

My favorite local cost experience is The Beaufort Ghost Walk, fun ghost stories and great history of the area.

My favorite local gift is something from one of the local vendors at the Topsail Beach Craft Market. Beautiful homemade jewelry and purses made from recycled fabric.

My favorite local place to connect with water is the Calico Creek Boardwalk in Morehead City. The boardwalk winds through the maritime forest and marsh along the creek and at dusk the sun creates a beautiful glow over the water and marsh grass.

Happy holidays and enjoy time with family, friends, and fish!

A holiday message from CCRW Crew Member,

Kelly Burke

IMG_9129.JPG
I am most thankful for the fierce passion that CCRW has for the protection of the waters of the White Oak River Basin. Also, CCRW strives to give communities a voice when it comes to their concerns regarding the quality of water along with habitat/ecological concerns which are such a huge part of water quality issues.

My favorite local food are the watermelons I get from Cedar Point Market.

My favorite free experience is searching out small wetlands in our Croatan National Forest via Google Earth and then trying to find them.

My favorite cost experience would be taking the ferry to Shackleford Banks for a solo camping trip in the fall.

My favorite local gifts to give are the various crafts you can find at Salty Air Market, whether baskets or chimes, paintings of the coast, etc.

My favorite local place to connect with water would be the riverine forest swamps in the Croatan forest. The darkness created by the canopy, the sound of the White Oak River slowly moving and the multitudes of cypress knees, all different shapes and sizes make it a magical place.

Jingle all the Way to Protect Water Quality!

Image
Thank you to everyone who supports

Clean Water

this holiday season!

Donate Now
IMG_9405.jpg
Become a Member or Renew Today!
Be part of the Waterkeeper Admiral Club with your donation of $1,000 or more.

Your donation goes directly to programming that protects the quality of water and quality of life in coastal North Carolina.

Dark%20blue%20nautical%2C%20marine%20and%20sailing%20concept%20logo%20design.png
For more info about local water quality information, please contact:

Waterkeeper

Report a Water Quality Concern
WE NEED YOUR HELP!
Click Here to Support
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch
Programming and Services
Stack%20of%20Books%20Flyer%20%281%29.png
Grey%20Fresh%20Oyster%20Promotion%20Menu%20A3%20Restaurant%20Poster%20%28Facebook%20Post%29%20%282.5%20%C3%97%201.5%20in%29.png
Platinum

Business Members

34-LOGO-CUTOUT_adobespark-300x300.png
download-1_1.png
Gold

Business Members

Seaoats-gold.png
First%20Bank-gold.jpg
Surfreaks%20logo%202.jpeg
Logo%20with%20Co%20Name.jpg
Harr.Logo.png
Silver

Business Members

pecan%20tree%20inn.png
Become a Business Member Today!
Coastal Carolina Riverwatch

www.coastalcarolinariverwatch.org

Email not displaying correctly?

View it in your browser

Unsubscribe

Facebook Twitter Instagram